Monday, April 20, 2009

Paris Dog Cemetery, Asnières, Chapter 2...

As requested in the comments from a few of you on the below post, and also in several hundred e-mails that arrived today, I cannot do otherwise than try to respond to the demand for more...

So, continuing with the post just below this one, the arch and the column with two sculpted dogs heads are at the entrance to the "Cimetière des Chiens" (Dog Cemetery, although it has all sorts of animals buried in it). I have to admit, as an animal lover from day one, I find this place a source of strong emotions, and everywhere in this cemetery the strong bonds of love and affection between the people these animals belonged to and the animals themselves are plainly visible.
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The inscription here translates as: On 15 May, 1958, a stray dog who came to die at the gates of the cemeterey was buried here. He was the forty thousandth animal to find their final resting place in the dog cemetery at Asnières...
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For the Saint Bernard shown here, the inscription said that he saved 40 people over the years, but died trying to save the 41st. In fact, it says it was the 41st that killed him...
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6 comments:

Adrian LaRoque said...

Thank you for sharing!

English Rider said...

Gotta find the back-story on that 41st savee!

Steve said...

Wow. This place looks incredibly noble and uplifting despite being a cemetary.

Nathalie said...

For the Saint Bernard, they say it's the 41st that killed him? I hope this isn't to be taken literally, knife or gun in hand?

Nathalie said...

J'aime bien l'histoire du chien errant qui vient mourir aux portes du cimetière et qui se trouve être le 400 000ème à y être enterré. Ca fait une belle histoire pour un chiffre bien rond. C'est l'étoffe dont sont faites les légendes !

Owen said...

Well, I can see I'm going to have to try to dig up the story on the 41st rescue effort that killed the St Bernard... I was wondering the same thing as you, Nat.

And yes, totally agree with you Steve, it is a noble place, and I felt totally humble walking around in there, treading lightly...