Tuesday, September 15, 2009

The Show Must Go On . . .

In my blogging travels, by coincidence I suppose, or hazard if you will, around the same time last Spring I stumbled on two blogs out in California, both run by the female half of a mixed nationality couple, and in both cases the male half of said couple was French, and to add to the coincidence, both of the Frenchmen in question are experienced in one way or another with the stone trade... the art of cutting, carving, or building with stone, as in cathedrals, or gravestones, or beautifully carved fireplaces, and everything else under the sun that could be crafted from stone. The first blog in question, which as the name implies is now balanced between two continents, is "Halfway to France", which is one of the all around finest blogs I've had the pleasure of coming across to date. . . give it a try, perhaps you'll see what I mean.
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The second blog in question is another pure pleasure to read, billed as "Where's My Effing Pony". I was thinking about stones and stone carving for the simple reason that while on vacation in August out in the city of Morlaix, in Brittany, I chanced to find a small abandoned stone-cutting site, which had obviously specialized in gravestones. It appeared to have been shut down from one day to the next, with work in progress, and half-finished projects laying about all over. God only knows why the owners and workers just walked away and left it, open to vandals and the elements . . . large pieces of lovely polished granite laying there for the taking. Me, I only take photographs, and I didn't have my truck there that day, but it was tempting . . . good granite and marble is not cheap . . .
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And there is one other blog that is an absolute must for anyone interested in abandoned buildings of any sort and cemeteries, which is the absolutely excellent "Tom B. Photography". . . Please do drop by and leave Tom some comments, he is doing simply amazing work documenting places before they get demolished . . .
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There were scrap piles of smaller pieces of cast-off cut stones, this one with a thermometer laying on it. A broken thermometer showing temperatures off the bottom end of the scale, which seemed somehow appropriate for a place specializing in the industry of death. Although I've been visiting various graveyards around the globe for years on end now, I rarely had thought much about just how big an industry death is, probably numbering in the billions of dollars, or euros or whatever currency you reason in, annually. But while spending an hour or two that afternoon poking around in this place, I got a much better inkling of some aspects of the business . . .
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Large machines are needed to hoist huge blocks of stone around in order to cut and carve them down to size, some of which were lying on the ground starting to rust . . .
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In one corner of a work area some posters depicting various models of gravestones were lying on the ground. Posters for gravestones . . . what a thought . . . not sure I want them on my wall at home . . .
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This mysterious piece of metalwork was laying there, I have no idea at all what this could have possibly been used for. If either of the gentlemen stone experts referred to above have an idea, or anyone else out there, I'd like to hear your ideas on this . . .
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There were abandoned bits of sculpture which hadn't quite made it onto a finished product before the end came . . .
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There were tools scattered about, and I was surprised to discover that there even exists a glossy color magazine for the funeral industry in France . . . this one with a heartwarming picture of an older man and his dog on the cover . . .
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Another copy had been left on the footplate of a forklift, depicting a cemetery in England . . . The metal plate above the gauges says "Prière de rentrer l'engin à l'abri le soir", which translates as, please bring the forklift back inside for shelter in the evening. . .
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Some of the larger machines had elaborate control panels. This one, if you look closely, has two red buttons at the upper left, with graphic images of a turtle and a rabbit, I suppose to make the machine run slower or faster ? I imagined a Dr Frankenstein sort of character here starting up the heart of his monster with these controls . . .
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It really looked like one day the people working here just walked off and left everything, the measuring gauge laying on a length of stone, the large machine saw just rusting . . .
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A yellow machine control box hanging in suspense . . .
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Two heavy gears still well greased. I didn't notice the spiderweb when I took the photo, just saw it this evening when preparing the image for publishing here . . .
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Another control panel, this one with the word "marche" on it, as in the French expression "Marche ou creve", which means "Keep moving or die", and also the word "Pompe" is visible, which could be for a pump, but also the term "Pompe-Funebres" which refers to mortuary services . . .
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This was perhaps the most startling find that afternoon . . . the magazine was laying open to a story about make-up products for corpes, with a photo of a rubber-gloved person applying lipstick to a cadaver, under the title, "Promise à un bel avenir", or "Destined for a beautiful future", or something to that effect, which had me just totally floored. I'd never thought that there might exist make-up products for the deceased. Isn't normal lipstick for the living suitable for cold lips ? Talk about getting a case of cold feet ! And the first line of the story, which is hard to read here, I admit, makes reference in English to a television show called "Six Feet Under" ! Macabre !
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In the wrecked office of the place a refrigerator was gaping open, the last article in it, an empty bottle of port . . . in case any thirsty ghosts might come around . . .
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This last piece is another I'm hoping a stoneworking expert can enlighten us as to how exactly these would be used. This piece of furniture had several shallow drawers, each containing an entire alphabet of letters, each drawer had a different sized alphabet in it. The letters were plastic. Were they used with ink of some sort to mark the letter on the stone, to be chiseled afterwards ? In any case, this entire place was fascinating, a real eye-opener for me, while thinking about eyes that will never open again . . .
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34 comments:

louciao said...

Wow! This stuff is terrific! I just had time for a real fast zip through but will be back for a loooong linger later. Oh yes, the photos are good, too! Sorry if I've said anything really stupid here..just take it with a grain of salt! Or contemplate this:

With regard to the issue of content, the optical suggestions of the spatial relationships verge on codifying the essentially transitional quality.

Owen said...

OMG Lynne, you are fast today, you get the early-bird award, which is a feather to wear in your elegant coonskin (with a ringed tail) cap... and wow, I'm going to need a drink before I even try to comprehend the dialectical rhetoric you just tossed out there, which has already started to boggle my mind with the infinitely marvellous possibilities involved in codifying the essence of living, dying, and death, or non-living, and if death is the time period after living, what is the noun for the time period prior to living, oooffff, take me back to Philosophy 101, I need a refresher course in existentialism... now, where's my beer ?!? Where's that Saj, I'm betting she has something up her sleeve, 'cause it's Tuesday !

louciao said...

I'm so speedy tonight, Owen, I feel like I'm in some kind of time warp. Plus, I'm having serious déja vu with this posting! AND I was the first one over at the Canterbury Bar for the Tuesday Tipple while it`s not even Tuesday here yet. Possibly explains my spinning head and talking in tongues.

Tom Bejgrowicz said...

You were totally right, Owen! What a fantastic place to explore. Color me green with envy, indeed.

As a graphic designer – and a fan of classic letterpress – what you found was a Type Case. Each drawer is organized by font and type size in order to make it more efficient when laying out the type for use.

While not the traditional lead, this plastic type would serve a similar purpose you outlined here; they'd be inked first, then transferred to a surface for etching on the stones.

Overall, there are so many twisted and curious objects on-site… definitely enough to keep me occupied for a day or so!

Nice one… and thanks for the kind words about my site. We explored an old distillery in Baltimore yesterday. Photos to come in the weeks ahead, as always!

Karen said...

Owen, what a wonderful post. I'm a sort-of collage artist who collects all kinds of stuff for collage and assemblage and that printers chest with the letters has me drooling as does the bright orange control panel.. ah, I wish I were there with a truck, too.
But the images conjure up scenes from and End Of The World film. How strange that they just left it that way. I'm surprised there wasn't a table with plates of food half eaten.
I grew up near a funeral home and the children who's father was the mortician were friends of mine. It was very interesting and yes they have make-up artists who do the deceased for viewing.
Thanks for posting to my blog. Yes I am still heading to Paris for the month of Oct. I rented an apt. in the 6th, have tickets to Mozart, Le Rock Opera and Zorro and plan to go back to linger at all the places I just sampled in December.

Owen said...

Lynne bis, ok, now I'm wondering why this is causing you déjà vu ??? Have you seen a place quite like this before with funerary magazines laying around ??? I mean, I could almost imagine that the stonecutters working here might have had some other kinds of magazines around, maybe even pinned up on the walls, but sheesh, magazines about lipstick on corpses ? Gotta wonder ! Bukowski once wrote a poem about some people who stole a corpse... but even HE didn't say anything about putting lipstick on it... Well, I better head back over to the Canterbury for another Cosmopolitan !

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Tom B., hey, you're quick tonight too... many thanks for the feedback, and jeez, can't wait to see the distillery photos... but whatever you do, don't tell Lynne Louciao here and Amanda (Saj) over at More Canterbury Tales where it is, or they will be there like lightning checking to see if there are still any bottles with anything left in them ! Anyway, happy hunting Tom ! Just push the "Rabbit" button if you want to get their faster...
:-D

Owen said...

Karen, now that you mention it, I may just have to go back there with a truck, otherwise all that gorgeous stuff is just going to grow legs and disappear... hope you have a fabulous time in Paris... half the fun is looking forward to it, I know...

The Sagittarian said...

So thats where you hid my bottle of port! honestly it wasn't me who took your boots.
I have a friend who makes-up corpses and yes there is a special makeup something about it having to stick better or something. Or maybe it needs to glow in the dark?? Anyway, the TV show Six Feet Under was great, I loved the first series best. It went downhill after that I reckon!
Great photos and amazing how you find these places. Stonework is really interesting, where my mum lives they use a lot of whitestone for carving - it is beautiful. Oamaru stone if you fancy googling it to see what I mean! Great post Owen, hope you don't over indulge in the Cosmpolitans - it is a school night y'know!! ;-)

La Framéricaine said...

Owen,

Thank you so much for your kind praise of Halfway To France here.

When Le F rises and shines I will bring your post and wonderful photographs to his attention because I'm certain that he will be fascinated by the dramatic impression of the rats having deserted the ship that you captured therein.

I am intrigued for my part by your documentation of flagrant waste. I always think of France as a frugal country with great appreciation, if not respect, for the hard-earned cost of launching a business, so it is stunning to see one carrement abandoned!

As a side note, I couldn't help but notice that it was Georges Brassens on the cover of that funerary industry magazine with his faithful companion hugged up close beside him. Weird...

That flat spikey orb is a "brush" of sorts but to what exact use it was once put remains a mystery.

Coincidentally, I saw my father, aunt, and grandmother all made up à la "6 Feet Under" at one time or another from '89 to '09 in their respective coffins in the same little viewing room in a small Oklahoma town funeral home.

I've gotten used to, if not comfortable with, Death riding shotgun these days. No way out but through.

Oddly enough, at A Malaysian in France Bee Ean very recently wrote of the death of an in-law family member and the disconcerting experience of going to the deceased's home and observing such a scene of wholesale abandonment.

Our house in Le Blanc was left much like that when the 89 year old, last woman standing from the previous generation went off to a nursing home from which she never returned except as a phantom. The house remained furnished with her belongings for 6-7 years after we bought it and was only pillaged by her daughter-in-law weeks before we imported our container last year in April.

And on, indeed, does the show go...

Martin H. said...

Owen,

Thanks for providing us with this mini-exhibition. I'm no expert but I know what I like...and I like this very much.

Thanks, also, for the recommended links. I'll check them out. In the meantime you might be interested to visit 'Idiotic Hat' at http://idiotic-hat.blogspot.com/ where Mike Chisholm posts some really nice work too.

All the best.

@eloh said...

Wow, how very odd. I've worn myself out looking at the pictures. The lipstick picture is creepy. Thanks Owen.

Bill Evertson said...

Fantastic post - especially since I've just returned from the A Book About Death exhibit in NYC. I love the shots of the magazines and advertisements intermixed with the equipment and debris.

Dedene said...

That was really interesting. Isn't it sad to see all those things going turning to rust?
I would have thought that the death business was good business.

Adam said...

Who puts Port in a fridge!?

It's strange because the machinery looks old and rusty, but the magazines quite fresh and new. Perhaps the owner died! Perhaps it is the factory equivilent of the Marie Celeste?

Susan said...

Wow - thanks for showing us Tom's blog - I did visit and leave a comment. It just goes to show that beauty and intrigue exist where you'd be least inclined to look.

Harry 'aka' Mojo said...

Bonjour Owen, belle ! vous avez vraiment trouvé un endroit très frais et fantasmagorique pour nous prendre cette semaine, j'avez vraiment aimé chaque photo, maintenez le bon travail et comment vous obtenez vos photos si grandes à votre page de blog ? Acclamations Owen, Harry

jeff said...

Chaque photographie est un voyage dans l'imaginaire et non dans le temps ! J'adore ce type de photos qui représentent des objets rouillés, usagés, mécaniques, oeuvres d'arts ignorées et laissées à l'abandon !...
Mais tu es là avec ton appareil pour leur redonner vie dans ton blog et pour le "régal" de nos yeux !
Tu nous racontes une histoire à travers ces photographies ! Rien ne disparait tout à fait ! Les choses se transforment et deviennent autre !
Tu as quand même déniché une bonne bouteille dans un réfigérateur qui ne doit plus produire de fraicheur mais qui a encore gardé sa lumière allumée ! La preuve... elle nous éclaire pour y voir plus clair dans nos pensées !

Ciao Owen ! Merci de nous livrer à travers tes photographies ta sensibilité, ta poésie, ton écriture si fine d'un monde qui ne disparait pas tout à fait !

A bientôt Owen !
Amitiés !...

TechnoBabe said...

Some of these items are exactly what some people look for to place in their garden landscapes. The mysterious metal Cleopatra necklace thingy would be great on a fence.

Loulou said...

"Macabre", ce terme m'a envahit tout de suite avant qu'il n'apparaisse plus loin sur ta page. Ta plume est un régal, tes histoires au fil du temps passé sont des trésors pour les humbles lecteurs qui te suivent.
J'aime tout particulièrement les panneaux orange, puis bleu.
Là encore, c'est Tim Burton qui s'impose à moi et l'évocation de monstre créé de toute pièce tels des Frankesteins en série illustre parfaitement cette idée.
Je vais m'arrêter là car tu as déjà eu de longs commentaires, tu connais notre admiration pour tes photos, ton regard définitivement pas comme les autres, ta plume délicieuse et ta manière si singulière de nous faire aimer le MACABRE (si si !).

PS - les 3 tiroirs ouverts sur le dernier tirage sont un honneur "au merveilleux chiffre trois" :-)
Bises et à très bientôt
Loulou

English Rider said...

Owen, thanks for the promo, glad you like us women of the stone world (by association). I suspect the type face is made to fit in a frame and serve as a cache for sandblasting the lettering, so much faster than chiseling. We sand blasted a large scene on a piece of green marble for a bathroom years ago. Egyptian story of creation, very phallic, for a woman who had just divorced a well known high tech emperor (company begins with O). That and surrounding the bathroom TV with marble and making the side of the bath tub wide enough for the German Shepherd to sit and share his mistress' evening bowl of ice cream after kids and horses were put to bed. 48 slabs used in that mega-space.

Cergie said...

C'est ainsi la vie, Owen, les entreprises disparaissent avec les personnes qui ont le savoir, les outils de travail sont démantelés et plus personne ne sait à quoi cela sert.
J'ai visité il y a peu une papéterie, une usine à papier dans le Limousin, artisanale. Je n'ai pas les mots pour expliquer, il y avait une machine à composer les textes à imprimer, mon mari serait là il saurait expliquer. Cette machine moule en plomb au fur et à mesure de l'écriture sur un clavier, une jeune femme est formée depuis deux ans par quelqu'un qui sait encore pour ce travail et l'entretien de la machine. Cette jeune femme dont la formation n'est pas terminée ainsi que la personne qui la forme sont ce qu'on appelle au Japon des "trésors vivants"; c'est moi qui ai fait ce rapprochement. Et j'ai pensé qu'il aurait fallu former plus d'une personne car si celle ci disparait, le savoir disparaitra. Comme ont disparus bien des savoirs déjà.

Il existe, sais tu, un salon du funéraire à Paris, et paraît-il on y rit énormément...

Cergie said...

Ah ! Je confirme : c'est bien Brassens sur la couverture et il n'était pas si agé, il est mort il y a bientôt 28 ans à l'âge de 60 ans.
[Sa pierre tombale sur mon blog Cergipontin].

Marguerite said...

As always, Owen, your imagination is working overtime, cher! :) Enjoyed your interesting photos and especially the one of the type case. Great post!

Owen said...

Hi all... am a little slow getting back here to reflect on and answer all your kind and thoughtful comments here... but I will... little by little. Amazing how little things like having to work for a living, a bit of illness (3 out of 4 or the Toad family currently have nasty colds, and I'm one of them, but not to worry, it isn't pig flu... yet), a few car problems, family life, and social life, what little there is, can keep one from blogging away... but such is life I suppose, an exercise in finding balance...

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Saj, well I didn't really think those boots had made it all the way to New Zealand, but one never knows. The Cosmos were delish, and I didn't over indulge, hic !, just had a few to try to drown the cold, but it didn't work... nice time trying though. Will have to look up your white stone when I have a minute... so you know someone who actually makes up corpses ? I guess one becomes somewhat resiliant and stoic in such professions, mortuary humor is renowned as a coping mechanism... sooner or later I guess we're all headed that way... what was the title of the Jim Morrison biography : No One Here Gets Out Alive ?
Cheers and thanks for the drinks...

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Dear Fram, can't wait to hear what Mr F. thought of all that ! Thanks so much for this lovely long message here ! Yes, of course, you are absolutely right, that is George Brassens on the cover of that magazine, la Grenouille realized immediately, but it hadn't even occurred to me when I took the picture that they might have put someone famous on the cover of such a magazine. I'm tempted to go back and see if it is still there to see if there was an article about Brassens, maybe about his burial, in that issue, or if it was just cover decoration.

I'll take a look for the Malaysian in France blog, haven't seen that before...

And you've touched on a multitude of other thoughts here too, abandonement, waste; yes, France is no less victim than America or or other "western" nations where conspicuous consumption and conspicuous waste have become commonplace... the norm... which provides a wealth of material for a guy like me who loves to document deterioration...

See you soon I hope ! Gotta run to work now...

Roxana said...

you have indeed an eye for... hmmm, how should i call it, macabre details? :-)
i love the unfinished sculpture and the magazine ones, somebody has quite an ironic sense of humour...

Laurie said...

Oen, I am speechless! All I can say is: " " and " ".

Fantabulous!

Laurie

Owen said...

Hi Martin, many thanks for your visit, and I assure you, no certification whatsoever, expert or otherwise, is required to peruse these pages and sound off if one has something, anything, to say..., these pages are wide open to the greater public, whoever that may be. Am still waiting for the greater public to find out about this marvellously fabulous humble little blog, as currently the traffic meter is not exactly wearing itself out. But that's ok, there are a few really wonderful folks dropping in here, and all are welcome. It has already gone way beyond my wildest expectations. Anyway, many thanks for the reference to Idiot Hat, I took a quick look, will get back over there later if I can... time is short these days...

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Hey backwards "Hole@", guess we're all getting worn out slowly but surely, glad you enjoyed, even if a bit creepy, I couldn't believe this place, especially that it was wide open, no door, no gate, no guard dogs, just like an invitation to come on in...

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Hey Bill, the ABAD show in NYC sounds like it was incredible, wish I could have seen that. Many thanks, this was a crazy place to shoot some pictures, I kept thinking someone was going to jump out from a dark corner...

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Hi Dedene, yeah, I'm totally mystified as to why they just went off and left everything, some of the machines must have cost thousands when they were new. I would agree with you in thinking the death trade must be thriving even in these hard economic times, if not even getting a little boost from hard times...

Owen said...

Adam, now that is a very pertinent, important question : Who does put port in a fridge ? Perhaps people who like it cold and don't want to water it down with ice cubes as some folks do ? Personally I prefer my two fingers of port at room temperature... anyway, this bottle was bone dry, I checked... of course !

And wow, you really have an eye for detail, noticing some of the magazines looked clean... The one with Brassens on the cover was pretty grimy, dusty, but the others may have been tossed around recently by other visitors / scavengers / photographers like me ? There were some empty beer cans looking fairly recent that suggested some folks had been there not long before me.

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Susan, glad you enjoyed Tom B.s blog, his photos are wonderful... and was just over looking at the vultures at your place. What amazing birds...

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Harry ! C'est fou, ton français est parfait... alors, c'est quoi ton secret, tu avais une grand-mère française ? Merci en tout cas, je passe pas mal de temps à chercher des sites amusants comme ceci à photographier... So, you're interested in making your blog photos bigger on your page ? I did a post on that very subject back last Spring, somewhere around March or April I think, the title was something like "A Technical Interlude", and it explains in some detail how to make images bigger on the blog page. Basically it involves editing both the HTML of your blog layout in the blog parameters, just set the widths wider in the template, and then each time you post a photo, on the post editor where you create the post, use "Edit HTML" at the upper right, and change the width and height in the HTML, and change the "s" value from the default of 400 to something bigger like 1024. Anyway, that's what I use... good luck...

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Ah sacré Jeff, seulement toi aurait remarqué que le frigo avait toujours une lumière allumée... pour nous éclaircir dans la nuit noir de la disparition des choses... tu as raison sans doute, toute se transforme, soit lentement, soit rapidement, soit parfois d'une manière carrément explosive... mêmes les meilleures tisanes en bouteille se transforme, parfois en acide si l'on ne les consomme assez vite... En tout cas, merci mon ami, là tu débordes de gentillesse ! Touché le crapaud fou du lanterne magique... allez, à bientôt...

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Hi Techno, true indeed, some folks, like me, collect all sorts of rusty old junk to decorate their lives with... although I'm running out of space now, so I tend to collect just photos these days... But there were some classic pieces in this place, for sure....

Owen said...

Ah Loulou, sacrée fée Loulou, quel plaisir tu me fais là... bien sûr le numéro trois est présent pour faire homage à tes séries de trois... et si tu as remarqué, il y avait aussi trois photos de chats dans le post ci-dessous... et trois petites étages pour tenir les oeufs dans la porte ouverte du frigo ici... ah là, il y a des trois partout. Un million merveilleux mercis pour ces mots mirifiques dont tu me combles avec... Bisoux à vous tous à Delhi !

PS finalement on pourrait arriver à imaginer que le "macabre" en fait n'est qu'un autre aspect de la vie qui pourrait devenir très touchant et fascinant, car nous sommes tous concernés tot ou tard...

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Hi English R., you are quite welcome indeed... and I do like stone-age women, err, women of the stone trade, or whatever... hope all is well with you and Hub and the dogs, sounds like a handful. So now I'm curious as to how such letters really are used... sandblasting, ink transfer, other? Will have to track down an expert and ask... Sounds like quite a bathroom you installed for those folks !

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Salut Cergie, certes, nous avons créé une société tellement complexe avec tellement de machines complexes que forcement il y en aura qui vont tomber dans l'oubli et disparaître des connaissances des gens, peut-être dans mille ans un archéologue va les retrouver et sera émerveillé par nos créations historiques... Merci en tout cas de ta visite ! Et oui, c'est Brassens, qui d'ailleurs a bien chanté une fois ou deux des croque-morts et pompes-funebres il me semble... il est génial...

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Hi Marguerite... merci ! And wow, so far you all are having a very quiet hurricane season, strange how one year can be so active, and the next year, almost nothing... strange indeed... Were you there when Katrina came through Louisiana ?

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Hey Roxana ! "Somebody"? Hmmm, I wonder who you mean ? Perhaps the gargoyle who sits on my shoulder whispering instructions in my ear, which is how I find these things in the first place... :-D And I absolutely loved your pale faces and poetry with them...

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Laurie ! you're back ! Hope you are extremely well, I thought you might like this one... wish you'd been there, I'm sure you would have enjoyed it. And just a couple of days later not far from this place I found a second site with abandoned gravestones out behind a stone cutting shop... more photos to come... it was a fruitful Summer... take care...

the watercats said...

I want the machines, (especially the one with the tutle and hare).. I want the drawers with the letters in and I want the big cogs!.. where do you find these places.. I would love to explore a place like this! Evereywhere over here has been fenced off, locked up, health and safety'd to the hilt!.. I must admit I found the magazine with the cadaver lipstick add a bit wierd, and disturbing.. it was like something a necrophiliac would have stashed under his matress, lol... :-O

Owen said...

Oh you Watercats ! I'll tell you a secret, I took that magazine home with me, and now it is stashed in my office collection of the weird and wonderful... I couldn't just leave it there to rot. But it is not under my matress, I assure you !!! No, although I'm strangely fascinated by cemeteries and places like this, I'm not a necrophiliac... But listen, I'm sure if I came to Ireland, which I'd love to do one of these days, I'd be able to track down some interesting run-down abandonment somewhere, I can't believe that there's none whatsoever about in such a big island... my magic nose has rarely failed me in the past... in the meanwhile, keep the great music coming, I'll be by your place soon !

Nathalie said...

You know Owen, I'm not a huge follower of the current fad for photography of derelict places - the way some photographers seem to thrive on trash material sometimes leaves me utterly cold. But I find your photos extremely moving in that they record an activity that was stopped suddenly. Work half-done, bottles in the fridge, professional magazines, it's amazing !

The Georges Brassens was quite moving, as was the one above it and the one about "thanatopracteur, un métier d'avenir" (where did you read that they don't use regular lipstick?)

A fantastic post !

AmyR said...

Thank you for linking this wonderful photographer! What fantastic documentation. :)

Sar@h said...

Je n'ai guère eu le courage de lire les réponses en anglais, si personne ne l'a écrit, sur la cinquième image, ça ressemble à un hérisson pour ramoner les conduits de cheminées.